Misophonia Support

Misophonia Treatment and Coping Techniques

Our Top Misophonia Coping Techniques

These tips have been compiled from the current body of peer-reviewed studies on misophonia, reports from other misophones via this website and other relevant sources, as well as my own experiences. Click here

Readers' Misophonia Coping Techniques

We all have different ways of dealing with our misophonia and we can all learn from one another’s experiences. This is a collection of your favourite misophonia coping techniques. Click here

Lead a happy and fulfilling life with misophonia

Your brain is unique and wonderful.

At least one study to date suggests that people with misophonia could be significantly prone to more “Divergent thinking and creative achievement”.

You can see more details here.

The important thing to know is that your life doesn’t have to be defined by the challenging aspects of misophonia.

With knowledge, acceptance and support you can have a wonderfully happy and fulfilling life living with misophonia. There may even be some benefits, which might surprise you.

How to Help a Loved One With Misophonia

Misophonia is a complex and nuanced disorder. It can be extremely challenging to live with for parents, siblings, partners and best friends. Here are our top tips to help you and your loved one cope

Looking for professional support?

Get help for you or a loved one from a trained professional

You can see a list of professional misophonia support providers along with their contact details here. This includes free NHS treatment programmes (for UK readers) as well as resources for the USA and the rest of world 

You can do this. Remember these 3 pillars

Acceptance

Misophonia is real ‘it’s a thing’ and you have done nothing wrong. It’s just slightly different brain wiring that’s all and once you know that you can work with it

Know Your Brain

Understanding what’s happening in your brain during a misophonia episode makes it easier to deal with situations using proven CBT techniques

Stay Stress Free

If you’re stressed you will be far more sensitive to triggers. Plenty of sleep, mindfulness, meditation, yoga and long walks in nature are all excellent ways to destress

Your Misophonia Stories

See what others with misophonia have to say about their experiences

Paula’s Misophonia Story

This is the #63 edition of our My Misophonia Story series. This week features Paula (34) from the UK. Each week we'll feature a new reader story, so...

read more

Ash’s Misophonia Story

This is the #62 edition of our My Misophonia Story series. This week features Ash (17) from the UK. Each week we'll feature a new reader story, so...

read more

Sarah’s Misophonia Story

This is the #61 edition of our My Misophonia Story series. This week features Sarah (47) from the UK. Each week we'll feature a new reader story, so...

read more

Frequently Asked Questions

Some of questions we’re often asked about misophonia

Is misophonia genetic?

An informal study by 23andMe suggests that people with misophonia may have the gene variant rs2937573 in common. While this is a fascinating finding there may be more to it than that as you can see here.

Does misophonia get worse as you get older?

Some say it improves, others say it stays the same and then there are those that say it gets worse. The truth is we don’t know. My view is that the mechanics of misophonia stay the same (and that it doesn’t ‘advance’, in the same way someone with autism doesn’t get more autistic). However I do believe that environmental factors may fluctuate and effect how you are able to cope with it for better or worse at any given time.

Is there a cure for misophonia?

There’s no ‘cure’ for misophonia in the same way that there’s no cure for dyslexia and other neurological disorders. It’s just different brain wiring. Anxiety medications may mask the more challenging aspects temporarily but may be detrimental over the long term and don’t address the root of it. By far the most effective treatment that we’re aware of is to focus on maintaining as stress free environment as possible and of using mindfulness and CBT.

Is misophonia a feature of autism or a type of OCD?

Research is still very much in its early days. What we do know is that many people have misophonia without having autism and vice versa. The same is also true of OCD. While there appear to be higher instances of individuals having both, for now this is seen as being a  ‘comorbidity’ (where a patient has one or more disorder at the same time). As a wider point, the labelling and classification of diseases, and especially brain disorders, can be somewhat arbitrary and lacking in nuance. It is absolutely possible that shared brain regions and states are involved.

Share on Social Media